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Ophthalmology at Fitzwilliam Hospital

At Fitzwilliam Hospital you can be assured of treatment specific for your needs, delivered by one of our specialist Consultant Ophthalmologists.

Our continued investment in technology means that we can provide a wide range of treatments.

Cataract Surgery

The lens of the eye focuses light onto the back of the eye where the image is then sent to the brain. The lens lies just behind the pupil and measures about one centimetre across. When we are young it is usually crystal clear but as we get older the lens becomes discoloured and hazy and when this starts to affect your vision we call the lens a cataract. This process can happen at any age although it is more common with advancing years.

Cataract surgery is an extremely successful procedure giving excellent results and for most patients, the stay in hospital is just a matter of hours. The operation is usually performed with some form of local anaesthetic, however, a General Anaesthetic can be used if preferred.

Yag Laser 

Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is a fairly common complication of cataract surgery. Sometimes you can develop a thickening of the back (posterior) of the lens capsule which holds your artificial lens in place.

This thickening of the capsule causes your vision to become cloudy. If this happens you may need to have laser treatment to make vision clear again. Once you have had the laser treatment for PCO it doesn’t normally cause any long term problem with your sight.

There is a risk of developing posterior lens capsule opacification (PCO) following your cataract surgery. PCO is a complication that causes the back of the lens capsule (which holds your artificial lens in place) to thicken which causes cloudy vision. If this happens you may need to have laser treatment to make vision clear again.

Posterior lens capsule opacification is fairly common and once it has been treated does not normally cause any long term problems with your sight.

The procedure to treat posterior lens capsule opacification (PCO) is a painless process which is usually done in an outpatient clinic, and normally takes about 15 minutes.

For more information please contact us on 01733 308 238

Diabetic Retinopathy

Retinopathy is one of the several eye diseases caused by sub-optimal control of diabetes and other co-existing vascular risk factors. There are a variety of less common, but in some instances more severe, eye diseases that can result from diabetes. It is worth knowing that well controlled diabetes rarely ever causes eye disease no matter how long a patient has had the disease.  

Retinopathy

Retinopathy is one of the several eye diseases caused by sub-optimal control of diabetes and other co-existing vascular risk factors. There are a variety of less common, but in some instances more severe, eye disease that can result from diabetes. It is worth knowing that well controlled diabetes rarely ever causes eye disease no matter how long a patient has had the disease. 

Problems with focusing, pre-mature cataracts together with accelerated progression, optic nerve disease, major retinal vascular disease and eye movement disorders are some other problems caused by poor diabetic control. Early detection of retinopathy thanks to the national screening programme has vastly improved diagnostic technology.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is nowadays popularly reclassified as a retinal disease rather than an optic nerve disease that it used to be considered as. The ability to image the retinal nerve fibre layer and the ganglion cell layer and their combined accuracy in detecting the onset and progression of Glaucoma has revolutionised our understanding of the disease. This has led to treatments that offer neuro and vascular-protection for maintenance of enduring healthy vision. An overwhelming majority of patients are managed very well by treatment with eye drops

Retinal Vein Occlusion

CRVO (Central Retinal Venous Occlusion) and BRVO (Branch Retinal Venous Occlusion) are retinal diseases caused by outflow obstruction of blood out of the retina. The resultant increased tissue pressure causes hemorrhages (bleeding) and retinal oedema (water-logging). The degree of ischaemia (or absence of blood circulation) can be variable and often worse in CRVO as the entire venous drainage is impeded.

For more information please contact us on 01733 308 238